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mission. the senior sa senior advisor sae noticed the pope slowing down. we watched pope john paul ii suffer through the last few years of his papacy. maybe he wanted to avoid that. the former cardinal joseph ratzinger was touched by the charges of child abuse in the catholic church. bill: what happens next on the dates that are aren't? >> reporter: he's leaving february 28, 8:00 p.m. local time in rome. that leaves that very important vacancy and sets up a conclave of cardinals. vatican says by mid-march at the latest. vatican says we should have a new pope by esther sunday march 31. pope benedict will not take part in the conclave. usually a conclave happens after a pope dies. 1415 was the last time a pope quit in office. who is the next pope? he could come from developing areas of the world. it guarantees a lot of drama and a lot of black or white smoke coming from the roof is sistine chapel. march report concerns about the pope's health surfaced this past christmas eve. have it can watchers say he looked frail as he delivered the midnight mass. here he is riding in a motorized car
for the church. >> pill grms, my last general audience. like pope john paul, watches over his church. i wish all of his joy and gratitude. we have called to our renew trust in our lives and a life of the church. i'm personally grateful for his love and guidance in eight years since i accepted his call to serve as the successor of peter. i was deeply grateful for sustaining support and prayers from so many of you, not only in rome but also around the world. this is a decision that i have made after much prayers. i will continue to accompany the church with my prayers. and ask each of you to pray for me and for the new pope. faith and hope to god who continues to watch over our lives. his great affection, his love and care, which opens our hearts to the fullness of life. i part my blessings. thank you. >> the american flags are waving. many pilgrims there who have traveled from the united states. also a large ex-pat community there and students who studied there. you know many of those students you teach them at duquesne university. le met get your thoughts. >> there are -- one of the things about
2. both he and john paul ii saw their papacies an attempt to interpret vatican too properly. not so much a modernization of the church, vatican ii was an evangelical missionary council. to some degree modernizing to make the church a more apt meaning to that. hence the wide travel for example of john paul ii, hence the great teaching of benedict xvi. i think that's his major legacy. >> they're very different at least in their style and in their i guess pastor abilities in some way, although not very different philosophically. >> this has been a really unsuccessful papacy and the greatest single act of his papacy is that our church is in real trouble and i am not able to cope with the trouble that we're in. i think there are some of the cardinals that are hoping that the next pope that they elect will convene a vatican 3, something that will set the church on a new course, reach out to the modern world, instead of what has happened under john paul ii as well in terms of the theology and benedict which has been a look backwards in terms of what the theology means, what the role of the
the doctrinal watchdog for john paul ii. the people who met the pope said that he was shy and charming. his most important writings dealt with things such as the importance of love. >> he is the most intelligent, intelligent,pope we have had in years. his sermons and harmonies are beautiful. >> he warned that excluding christianity from national debate could be harmful for democracy. by the time pope benedict came to westminster cathedral, he renewed respect for his argument that religion should stay at the heart of public life. over the last few years, catholicism has grown in the developing world. in its birthplace of europe, he has found the tides of secularism, all but impossible to stem. the pope defended moslems by quoting historical criticisms of it is lomb. -- islam. he has faced criticism over the handling of the sexual abuse crisis. he has been accused of doing too little to prevent abuse by priests. >> there is a suspicion that they were being shielded by j.p. ii rather than by him. >> he hoped he could build up a struggle church, but in seven years, there was little that he could do.
contrast to that of pope john paul ii, his immediate predecessor, who served 27 years, the second longest of any pope. during that tenure, john paul was shot by a would-be assassin and later contracted parkinson's disease. in his last years he struggled to walk, speak, and even listen until his death in 2005. days later, white smoke arose from the chimney of the sistine chapel to signal cardinal joseph ratzinger election. he was at 78 the oldest pope elected in nearly 300 years. the future benedict xvi was born in germany in 1927, an archbishop of munich and then cardinal. for nearly three decades he was one of pope john paul's most trusted aides enforcing conservative doctrine. as pope he warned against growing secularism in the west. it was not always a popular stance in europe and north america as evidenced today. >> the next pope we need somebody who will modernize the church somewhat and move with the times so that they don't lose their audience and all the younger people. >> hopefully the next pope will be eventually a little bit better and more inclusive than this one was. >> suare
didn't see anything like what we saw during the twilight of the john paul years, with the series of hospitalizations here in rome, or sort of spectacular public collapses, i think it's more simply that benedict xvi's diagnosis is that he's going to be celebrating his 86th birthday in april. we have seen him pairing back public commitments and so on. he believes that the energy required to lead the catholic church forward at this moment is beyond his capacities. and i think he's decided therefore, not to wait for a moment of crisis, but while he's still capable of doing so, to make the decision to step aside and let somebody else take the baton. >> reverend martin, people are using words like shocking, unprecedented, why is this such a surprise? why didn't anybody expect this except for his inner circle? >> well, it hasn't happened for centuries, and you know, as john allen was saying, there had been speculation, there was speculation about john paul ii and people knew benedict was frail and in a sense diminishing physically, but i think the fact it hadn't happened so long means i
appointed by benedict the 16th t-as well as pope john paul ii. >> wendy: the current pop was so popular. he had just started using twitter. and he was extremely popular and extremely conservative. >> yes. >> wendy: it just begs to the question of why? 85 is old, but he wasn't sick, you know? >> it was quite interesting. his brother was interviewed, who was an older priest. and the brother indicated there were two specific issues that might have caused this. one is the sense of information that was leaked from his office, as well as, of course, the sex abuse scandal. >> wendy: dr. becker, from regent university, thanks for being with us. >> always a joy. >> george: the u.s. congress is calling on secretary of state john kerry to seek the immediate release of an american pastor imprisoned in iran. pastor saeed abedini is serving eight years in prison because of his christian faith. more than 80 bipartisan members have sent a letter to explore every option. the effort is needed to protect a u.s. citizen from torture and life-threatening punishment. >> wendy: in the african nation of mali, figh
to pope john paul ii. he talked to people about how his demise seemed somewhat of a dishonorable end to his papacy. he had in his mind already what type of glorious exit, to use the phrase, he may want in store for him. let's get some perspective as to what is coming out of the vatican as to why this is happening, what it means. john allen, our senior vatican analyst, joins us now. what do we know, john? >> reporter: what we know is that we are living through a day of enormous shock here in rome. not so much the pope benedict xvi chose to resign. he signaled two years ago that he would be open to doing that, but the fact that we had absolutely no indication this was coming today. precisely because of that, therefore, there are some enormous unanswered questions about how all of this is going to play out. i suppose the biggest questions would be, "a," what will the role of a retired pope be? will he continue to play any kind of public role? will he continue to exercise any influence on the future direction of catholicism almost whether he wants to or not? and the second obvious questi
april 2005 who took over for the immensely popular pope john paul ii. his papacy has been marked by controversy. the pope criticized for how he handled the situation in his prior jobs when he was archbishop in germany and later a top vatican official. on a visit to america in 2008, he became the first pope to meet with the victims themselves. on a lighter note, benedict has become known as his personal idiosyncracies like his bright red shoes. he's been using a moveable platform to carry him down the aisle of st. peters basilica. this morning after he made his announcement, he was helped down from his chair. while this is a surprise the pope has said in the past that he reserved the right to resign if he felt too old to perform his duties. what's next? he still hopes to serve the church through a life dedicated to prayer. elizabeth, back to you. >> greg, good morning to you. lot of people really surprised by the announcement this morning. some cardinals in the audience didn't understand what pope benedict was saying? >> that's also true. one of those occasions in rome the pope ac
. >> and john paul would have been. >> a movie star. >> that gives you a sense of the different temperaments. yet the emotion that is now being really demonstrated as these cardinals say farewell face to face for the last time, all of them kissing the fisherman's ring which we know will be defaced and destroyed which benedict xvi's papacy ends. >> that's right. there are two instruments of the papal office, one is the ring and one is the official papal seal. the seal is kept in a safe in an office in the vatican. of course in the middle ages as you know, christiane be these were what were used to stamp paper bulls. which made them official. after a papacy had ended, someone might use the instruments to falsify papal documents. that's where the custom of destroying them came from. that will be honored at the end of benedict's papacy as well. >> thank you. we'll continue to watch this with all of you. back to you, john and zoraida in new york. >> it is interesting to see this as history is being made at the vatican. pope benedict xvi saying good-bye to the cardinals who have assembled and many
this happened eight years ago when john paul died. you have this uncertainty. but you also have this other thing which is entirely new. 8:00 tonight, it's over. >> and to a certain extent, the pope and his cardinals are writing the rule books as we go along. one of these issues is, how much fanfare does the pope want as he says his good-bye. we saw the final audience yesterday. he had this emotional meeting with the cardinals this morning. is this the good-bye that he wanted? >> this is the good-bye, definitely. i mean, the people cheering right now are people in the secular state who work where i do. just two floors above where they are, the domicile. i think it's important that they were able to say good-bye. they didn't want anything huge. he had that with the audience. he's not somebody that likes big celebrations in general. i think it's only right that the people who worked with him, his clollaborators got to give him sendoff. >> as we watch his ride to the top of the hill to a white helicopter. a short ride to castel gandolfo, about 20 miles out of rome, it's his residence. and then the p
benedict who stepped in and became pope after pope john paul ii, the iconic pope of the 20th century, stepped down. of course, pope john paul ii had been pope since 1979. and so, of course, his impact felt not only in the religious world but also the political world. pope benedict, though, never really, of course, given the chance to emerge from the shadows. and it seems that for a good bit of his time, he was dogged by allegations that came through the child abuse scandal throughout certainly before his reign. he was constantly being dogged by questions regarding that. but mark halperin, an iconic figure replaced by pope benedict who has had a very short tenure and now is stepping down in a way that a lot of popes don't step down before they die. >> short tenure, and it's going to be scrutinized for some of the issues you raised. to me now thinking forward, it's going to be a very big story for catholics and others around the world including the question of will it be another european? there's going to be pressure to look to another region of the country as there was last time. i th
, pope john paul. before the body is moved across st. peter's square to the basilica. unlike all of the past popes whose reign ended in this room, benedict is the first to leave office still breathing. like a king, attending his own funeral. today, the dean of the college of cardinals thanked him for his service. benedict stood up and embraced him. the pope wasn't expected to speak, but he did. saying, among you is also the future pope, to whom i pledge my unconditional reverence and obedience. that hasn't been an issue for 600 years. today, vatican cameras will follow benedict's departure, minute-by-minute. 19 cameras documenting his trip, live. every angle covered, from his final wave at st. peter's. they'll be there with him on the helicopter, as he flies to castel gandolfo. there, he'll greet the faithful one last time from the balcony. and then, tonight at 8:00 p.m., the swiss guard will leave and the gates will close. symbolically signaling that benedict is no longer pope. so, who is actually in charge in the interim? the papal camalango is in state. we're sure it's going t
the last several years of pope john paul's papacy. the poor man was so wracked with illness and kept on coming out in an ever more frail state. he hasn't canceled any engagements. we're hearing rumors that he decided no more transatlantaic travel after trips to south america. the word we're hearing is fatigue. we're going to hear conspiracy theories ranging from everything to the vatican bank to the horrible sexual scandals. pope gregory in the 1400s was forced out. it wasn't volunteer. it was like a much more pleasant version of what happened to an curry. the last time this happened was back in the 1200s so almost 700 years since this has been done voluntarily. it's really, really a shock. this had guy has always been renowned for his command of power within the vatican walls. >> listening to everything you're saying and the history there, there's got to be more behind this. it's just not a job people and you can away from, and as history has shown us, i know there are conspiracies and all. what do you think is the reason he is leaving now? >> i wouldn't want to speculate. we'll hea
a couple of times. he's very warm, has sort of those kind of qualities that pope john paul did, however, there are a few other people from growing areas of the world, they'll be looking at africa and latin america. there is also cardinal ouellet from question beck. he's from a huge diocese there. and even some talk, although a long shot, of cardinal dolan at 62. he's been a cardinal for less than a year and that would argue against him, although, a lot of people questioning whether they need someone like him, who's great at dealing with the media, great evangelizer at a time when the church is facing some, frankly, competition from protestant evangelists in parts of the world like latin america and africa, thomas. >> the one and only, the incredible chris jansing reporting live from rome. you can watch chris on "jansing and co." every day right here on msnbc at 10:00 a.m. eastern. chris, thanks again. >>> as president obama addresses north korea's third nuclear test at tonight's state of the union, he's also going to have an announcement on troops, our troops in afghanistan. just a shor
-perpetuating leadership. virtually all these cardinals who are picked either by pope benedict or by pope john paul, i believe, somebody correct me if i'm wrong, the average age is somewhere in the 70s, low 70s. there aren't if to really drive your metaphor into the ground, a lot of blue state sort of cardinals in that list, and so there are not a lot of obviously progressive candidates on the list of potential popes. i don't think progressive conservative, however, is the right optic. i think the real question is when you get someone elected who actually is open to change and dialogue on some of these issues, on the all male celibate priesthood, if not on women priests. birth control is kind of a separate issue. the church ares until this contraception fight over the obama plan, really hasn't preached very much about it. it's not only the faithful who let it go. it's really the church itself who sort of accept that. there just aren't a lot of catholic families of 12 kids anymore in most of the west, and increasingly, not in the third world either. >> e.j., i want to bring in our panel here in new yor
for somebody who will continue the intellectual, the pass storm mission of john paul the 2nd and benedict the 16th. who will be in alignment with them and their cardinals from europe, north america, latin america and africa that can do that very well. jenna: like all popes, really in the position of great power. there is also criticism that sometimes is levied upon someone with such a responsibility. i'm just curious when you reflect back over these last several years with pope benedict, what do you think is important when you look ahead to who is chosen for the next pope but not only for the leadership of the church but a religious leader, a spiritual leader for the world? >> i think one of the great challenges is reconciliation among people of different faiths of integrity, of spirituality, of purifying the church. this has been a great concern of pope benedict and i think his successor will be of the same mind, that, the people have to folk discuss on the person of jesus christ as christians, the work of charity and brotherhood. jenna: mr. anderson, so nice of you to join us today. we
surprised now twice over. first with a pope from poland. a great pope, pope john paul, and pope benedict xvi, also great pope from germany. both were surprises. certainly in latin america there are enormous challenges and enormous opportunities. large numbers of the faithful who are deserting the church. we need to bring them back. in fact, pope benedict had a trip scheduled to brazil this summer for world youth day. that's going to be a significant moment. certainly the cardinals will be looking to north latin america, too, as one of the candidates. >> quickly monsignor, i don't know if you see the photo of lightning striking st. peter's just 24 hours after the announcement. was this some sort of sign? >> well, certainly -- i live just a couple of minutes here. i saw it myself. i'm a witness. and i think the holy -- god himself was saying to us, these are going to be exciting times for the church. i am with you, i am present with you, and did not be afraid to go forward and make the right and the best decision for the church and indeed for the world. >> that's what thought when you saw the
, pope benedict xvi does have something on pope john paul ii, the catholic church experienced a 6% increase in favorability, up from 56% during pope john paul ii's tenure and that's what the survey says. >>> coming up, she beats out her husband in almost every popularity poll. now michelle obama is back on the road and we'll look at what the second term may hold for the first lady. >>> first, the latest from south africa on where the olympic star accused of murder is now a day after being released on bail. you're watching msnbc. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> more than 100 days after hurricane sand e some storm victims
the president and vice president as well as her replacement secretary of state john kerry. paul ryan is the first republican in the ratings, then marco rubio, jeb bush and speaker boehner. is it a taste of things to come if hillary runs in 2016? >> lefty blogs may be upset at steve doocy. i've seen other things on lefty blogs. i heard that steve doocy actually has calf implants. now, i don't have any evidence to back that up whatsoever. >> no. >> but, you know, just put a question mark at that. can we put a question mark at the end of that? >> you're referring to, of course, his own personal blog being implanted -- >> sam thought about getting calf implants because we're on a basketball team together. >> that's why he only does television from the waist up. >> exactly. >> just kind of a vanity thing. >> there is a nugget of probably something actually worth discussing here, which is our national obsession with hillary clinton and also the way women are scrutinized in the public lens. >> oh, totally. totally. >> and hillary, in particular, is an incredible sort of sign post for what w
or john paul ii. so they're like-minded men. >> reporter: american catholics still make up the largest religious denomination in this country. but many believe if it wasn't for immigration from asia and latin america, their numbers would be on the decline. so will a new pope be able to change this course? that certainly is the question on the minds of many of the faithful. cecilia vega, abc news, san francisco. >> some are calling it coincidence, but others say it's divine intervention. take a look at this lightning strike at the vatican just hours after the announcement from pope benedict. it touched the top of st. peter's basilica. one of the holiest places of the church. and it got the attention of new york's archbishop during an interview with diane sawyer. >> have you seen these pictures today? >> no, what is this about? >> this is -- they say this happened today. >> wow! is that not something? boy, oh boy. a lot of pasta overcooked with this lightning strike. can you believe it at st. peter's? and above the chair of peter is that beautiful window of the holy spirit coming down. b
for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago and his jd and phd from yale law school. his scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy. he is the author of "defending american religious neutrality," and several other books. and more than 80 articles and scholarly journals. sherif girgis is a phd student in philosophy at princeton university and a jd candidate at yale law school. after graduating from princeton, where he won prizes for best senior thesis in ethics and philosophy, as well as the dante society prize, he obtained a degree from the university of oxford as a rhodes scholar. he is the author of a recent book "what is marriage," described as the most formidable defense of traditional marriage ever written. we are grateful to him for participating in this event. >> thank you so much for the introduction. thanks, everyone, for coming. a special thanks to professor koppelman. i have a pleasure of speaking on the panel with him befor
the kind of italian curia that is the traditional source of popes until really pope john paul. and i think we'll end up with a similarly conservative pope. >> yeah, reverend al asked me during the commercial break what i thought. not that i would know anything about who's going to be the next pope. but one thing's for certain. given the last two popes' selection of cardinals throughout the world, they are all invariably quite conservative. so the next pope is going to, more probably than not, be similarly conservative. it's a bag job, the college of cardinals. they have rigged the deck. they have rigged the deck. >> but what you'll have, too -- >> spoken like a true catholic. >> you could have the first african pope. you could have the first latino pope. but ironically, those guys would be very conservative. you know, the growth of the church in africa is a very conservative movement. the same thing in latin america, although there's a bit of a protestant refirmation. he will be very conservative. >> everybody's talking about the possibility of an african pope. i just don't think it's goin
starting at noon eastern on c-span radio. "meet the press" at noon. john mccain, and mark kelly, co- founder of americans for responsible solutions on guns in america. at 1:00, guests include paul ryan, castro. chris wallace and lyndsay grahnm and rand paul. "state of the union" with jack reed and chuck schumer from new york. also, the chair of the house committee john rogers. haley barber, corey booker, and donald wharl. all starting at noone aste eastn on c-span radio. you can also listen with our free apps for your iphone, android, or black burry. -- blackberry. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> i think the women were interested in politics but had no ability to express that so they were attracted to bed who were going to be politically active or were already politically active. >> i fight each of them intriguing. probably half of them because they are so obscure. i think half of these would then probably would be almost totally unrecognizable to most men and women on the street. >> c-span premiere
and after. >> chris: senate republicans also talking about holding up the nomination of john brennan the president's chief counter terrorism advisor to head the cia and rand paul your colleague who will be on after the break says one of the things he wants to be sure is that a president can't order a drone attack against an american citizen without a judicial review. is senator paul wrong? >> i think the worst thing in the world is to have the courts decide who to target in the war on terrorism. courts are not military commanders. the commander in chief has the right under law and authorization to use military force to designate the enemy. i think we do need drones to patrol our borders but i don't think you need a drone to attack an al-qaeda operative within the united states. i very believe we are at war and any american citizen mo aids al-qaeda should be treated as a criminal combatant. drones are just a tactical weapon in the overall war. >> chris: when congress gets back from recess the week after this one, you are going to have just five days to try to deal with the sequester.
is an obstacle for chuck hagel's confirmation and vote there in congress and then this john brennan matter is very important to the issue of these targeted drone strikes, rand paul, the senator from kentucky has said that he is willing to hold up that vote on john brennan. if he doesn't receive assurances from the white house that the united states will not target any drone strikes on americans on american soil. so some of this information i think the administration is hoping will at least for now satisfy some of those members with these concerns, wolf. >> it's going to be a tough battle, i take it. both of these confirmations likely to go through next week. but it's by no means a done deal, is it? >> reporter: it's not a -- especially when you have senators saying they may hold up nominees and so we're going to have to wait and see whether or not senator paul is satisfied with the information that he's getting from the white house. but this is perhaps, you know, a break in an impasse that we've seen for many, many months, especially over this issue of benghazi. we heard senator lindsey gr
so even john boehner will understand it all. this bill behind me was passed by house republicans in may of 2012. it was designed by wisconsin congressman paul ryan. remember him? and of course it had cuts to programs like food stamps and medicaid instead of military spending. the bill's dead. it died when the 112th congress came to an end. here is another dandy that they say they passed. this was passed as part of john boehner's failed plan b fiscal cliff package. this one is also dead. and so let's recap. the republicans have exactly zero bills in this session, the 113th congress to avoid what we're facing on friday, sequestration. the house needs to introduce a bill before it can go to the senate. but john boehner is too busy saying tough guy words and blaming democrats. i think the secretary of homeland security summed it up best yesterday during a question-and-answer session. >> what impact would sequestration, were it to happen, have on the department? >> you know, i've been in government and public service a long time, 20 years almost. i have never seen anything like this.
paul ryan. had things gone differently on election night he would be sitting behind president romney but he is member of the house of receipt identifies. you see john kerry, long time senator from massachusetts and new secretary of state, a job many say he was born and bred for. you can see at the top of the any, the gallery. it's fascinating some of the people in the gallery. it's become now some would say a flag show, some would say a kind of theater that members of congress, the first lady, they bring a variety of people to sit in the gallery. everybody from gabrielle giffords, the victim of a terrible shooting. here you see first lady michelle obama. somewhat interesting in her box, i don't see the person there, a young 20-year-old man named alan alaman who is an illegal immigrant from nevada. he is someone the country, he is one of so-called dream act people. he was brought to the country as a child. president has ordered that there be no deportation of any of those people who were brought to the country as illegal immigrants, as children who are either in school or in the u.s.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)